Elizabeth WOOLVERTON

Female 1848 - 1937  (88 years)


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  • Name Elizabeth WOOLVERTON  [1
    Born 30 May 1848  Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 11 Apr 1937  Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 14 Apr 1937  Kirk Cemetery, Northampton, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 9 siblings 
    Person ID I313  The Descendants of Dr. John Larlee | The descendants of Jane Larlee and Joseph Woolverton
    Last Modified 6 Jun 2013 

    Father Joseph B. WOOLVERTON,   b. 06 Jun 1811, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Dec 1876, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Margaret S. GIBSON,   b. 19 Mar 1818, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1902, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 14 Apr 1836  Anglican Church Cemetary, 1972-NB, Lower Woodstock, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 10 children 
    Family ID F88  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family John James ROGERS,   b. 26 Dec 1843, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jun 1917, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 19 Jul 1871  Parsonage, Eel River, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Florence Louise ROGERS,   b. 28 Jul 1872, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jun 1873, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)  [natural]
    +2. Ethel Margaret ROGERS,   b. 01 Jan 1874, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN  [natural]
    +3. Olive Eliza ROGERS,   b. 21 Oct 1876, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Feb 1928  [natural]
     4. William Joseph Barton ROGERS,   b. 20 Feb 1877, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Dec 1948  [natural]
    +5. Harrison Turner ROGERS,   b. 04 Feb 1880, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Nov 1953, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)  [natural]
    +6. John Ansley ROGERS,   b. 09 May 1882, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 01 Sep 1955, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)  [natural]
    +7. Augusta M. ROGERS,   b. 09 Jul 1884, Northampton, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. UNKNOWN  [natural]
    Last Modified 14 Jan 2019 
    Family ID F139  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Custom Events Elizabeth WOOLVERTON 

  • Notes 
    • The following story was told to Christine Wolverton Davies on January 20, 2000 by Pauline Forrest based on information given to her by a resident of Northampton many, many years ago: "In the second half of the 19th century, an attractive young woman named Elizabeth Woolverton grew up in her parents' home in Northampton, New Brunswick. She was popular with friends of both sexes. Two young men were especially attracted to her. Their names were William Howard Kearney and Henry Auguustus Orr. Little is remembered about Mr. Orr's family. Mr. Kearney was a member of a prosperous farming family. "Kearney was deeply in love with Elizabeth and hoped to marry her. He went to Woodstock and purchased a pretty engagement ring in a velvet-covered box. There was a gathering being held at the Kirk, the community house of worship and Kearney planned to drive Elizabeth to her home following the meeting. On the way he wanted to give her the ring as he proposed marriagege. "On that particular evening, Kearny was longer than usual in completing his share of the barn chores. He hurriedly harnessed the family driving horse, hooked up the sleigh and travelled toward the Kirk. Arriving there as the meeting waas just about over, he waited outside with horse and sleigh in readiness. Imagine his disappointment when Elizabeth appeared arm in arm with Henry Orr. Kearney's disappointment turned to anger and the two young men began to argue. The argument became a fight with both young men rolling in the snow. A knife came into play and soon Orr lay on the ground with his blood staining the snow. Mr. Orr did not survive this encounter. (February 12, 1867) "Kearney left the scene, returning to his parents's home. He was charged with murder. When the trial was held, Kearney's lawyer obtained an acquittal (September 26, 1867). Soon young Mr. Kearney left for western Canada or western United States where he remained for many years. "Later Elizabeth Woolverton married John James Rogers of Northampton. The Rogers had 3 sons and 4 daughters. After Mr. Rogers died, Elizabeth married a Mr. Patchell from Whittepitlack, Maine and resided there for 10 or more years. Folllowng Mr. Patchell's death, Elizabeth returned to Northampton to live out her remaining years with her son Harry T. Rogers. When Elizabeth died, at a ripe old age, she was buried in the Kirk cemetery. It is reported that Henry Orr is buried iin the same burial ground. "In the 1930's, Hedley and Cora Slipp purchased the Kearney homestead. One of the stipulations in the bill of sale stated that Mrs. Kearney, the wdown of William Kearney's brother, was to live with the Slipp family for a stipulated time. Cora Slipp's daughter-in-law told me that Mrs. Kearney had shown her (Cora) a pretty little velvet-covered box containing a lovely ring given to her by her brother-in-law many years before. She told Cora that all the y years Kearney had been away, the ring in its velvet box lay buried under a floorboard in the farm woodshed." NB Vital Statistics Vol. 25 #2009: Trial of W. H. Kearney at Woodstock September 26th for the murder of Henry Angus Orr on Bebruarary 23, 1867. Testimonies of Alexander Orr, brother of deceased; Ansley Watson (husband of Mary Woolverton) of Northampton; Charles H. Woolverton of Northampton; David Gibson; Henry Bull; Edward Front; Joseph A. Woolverton; Hannah Hay; Mary Hay. Verdict: NOT GUILTY.

      The following story was told to Christine Wolverton Davies on January 20, 2000 by Pauline Forrest based on information given to her by a resident of Northampton many, many years ago:

      "In the second half of the 19th century, an attractive young woman named Elizabeth Woolverton grew up in her parents' home in Northampton, New Brunswick. She was popular with friends of both sexes. Two young men were especially attracted to her. Their names were William Howard Kearney and Henry Augustus Orr. Little is remembered about Mr. Orr's family. Mr. Kearney was a member of a prosperous farming family.

      "Kearney was deeply in love with Elizabeth and hoped to marry her. He went to Woodstock and purchased a pretty engagement ring in a velvet-covered box. There was a gathering being held at the Kirk, the community house of worship and Kearney planned to drive Elizabeth to her home following the meeting. On the way he wanted to give her the ring as he proposed marriage.

      "On that particular evening, Kearny was longer than usual in completing his share of the barn chores. He hurriedly harnessed the family driving horse, hooked up the sleigh and travelled toward the Kirk. Arriving there as the meeting was just a about over, he waited outside with horse and sleigh in readiness. Imagine his disappointment when Elizabeth appeared arm in arm with Henry Orr. Kearney's disappointment turned to anger and the two young men began to argue. The argument became a fight with both young men rolling in the snow. A knife came into play and soon Orr lay on the ground with his blood staining the snow. Mr. Orr did not survive this encounter. (February 12, 1867)

      "Kearney left the scene, returning to his parents's home. He was charged with murder. When the trial was held, Kearney's lawyer obtained an acquittal (September 26, 1867). Soon young Mr. Kearney left for western Canada or western United States where he remained for many years.

      "Later Elizabeth Woolverton married John James Rogers of Northampton. The Rogers had 3 sons and 4 daughters. After Mr. Rogers died, Elizabeth married a Mr. Patchell from Whittepitlack, Maine and resided there for 10 or more years. Followng Mr. Patchell's death, Elizabeth returned to Northampton to live out her remaining years with her son Harry T. Rogers. When Elizabeth died, at a ripe old age, she was buried in the Kirk cemetery. It is reported that Henry Orr is buried in the same burial ground.

      "In the 1930's, Hedley and Cora Slipp purchased the Kearney homestead. One of the stipulations in the bill of sale stated that Mrs. Kearney, the wdown of William Kearney's brother, was to live with the Slipp family for a stipulated time. Cora Slipp's daughter-in-law told me that Mrs. Kearney had shown her (Cora) a pretty little velvet-covered box containing a lovely ring given to her by her brother-in-law many years before. She told Cora that all the years Kearney had been away, the ring in its velvet box lay buried under a floorboard in the farm woodshed."

      NB Vital Statistics Vol. 25 #2009: Trial of W. H. Kearney at Woodstock September 26th for the murder of Henry Angus Orr on Bebruary 23, 1867. Testimonies of Alexander Orr, brother of deceased; Ansley Watson (husband of Mary Woolverton) of Northampton; Charles H. Woolverton of Northampton; David Gibson; Henry Bull; Edward Front; Joseph A. Woolverton; Hannah Hay; Mary Hay. Verdict: NOT GUILTY.

  • Sources 
    1. [S70] 1901 Census of Canada, (Name: Canada Federal Government;), 9, Line 6.
      Subdistrict: Northampton, Carleton County, New Brunswick
      District Number: 14
      Subdistrict Number: d-1
      Household #79
      Archives Microfilm: T-6439


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